Latin America Could Turn to Russia, China in Wake of Trade Split With US

The governments of some Latin American countries have signaled that they are ready to “break their dependence” on the United States; Russia and China could play a key role in the region, Venezuelan political analyst Ernesto Wong told Sputnik Mundo.

Chinese President Xi Jinping
In an interview with Sputnik Mundo, Venezuelan political analyst Ernesto Wong said that in Latin America, there are several factors which have given rise to the hope that this year will see a number of key political changes in the region.

One of these factors is the willingness of some regional governments to “break their dependence” on the United States and allow Russia and China to play a key role in the region, according to Wong.

“Latin America is at odds with Washington but it is developing friendly ties with China and Russia, which is why in 2017 the region is expected to overcome the imperialist dependence on the US and to establish more favorable conditions for exchange… trade and investment with Russia and China,” Wong said.

As for China, Wong referred to the January 20 meeting between Beijing and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), which he said opened up new prospects for the exchange of public and private capital.

“It’s important that none of the countries of the Pacific Alliance decided to break off relations with China, which means that they are  interested in continuing trade ties with Beijing,” he said. The Pacific Alliance is a Latin American trade bloc which currently includes Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

According to Wong, the most important affecting the Pacific Alliance is the existence of Trump’s so-called model of “neo-isolation.” The alliance had been seen as a close partner of the United States and Canada; its members (less Colombia) were among the countries set to co-establish the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) this month.

This initiative was nullified when Trump abandoned TPP on January 23. Trump also raised the question of revising the terms of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

“As a consumer, the US is in a critical situation after it greatly reduced its imports, which were supported by the free trade agreement. Trump wants to get out of it because he intends to develop national industry,” Wong said, adding that this process will also be affected by the critical situation in Western Europe.

Aside from to China and Russia, Latin American countries may also invest in Africa, according to Wong.

“This is potentially a good opportunity because openness toward Africa would help promote Latin American products there and the African continent would benefit from receiving equal conditions for exchange,” he said.

He added that such transparency would also be attractive for those countries in the region which are not progressive because they seek to improve relations with other regions, which could give them the opportunity to obtain a larger income.Wong emphasized that it is Latin America distancing itself from the United States and rapprochement between Eurasia and Latin America that will pave the way for regional countries becoming more independent and sovereign.

Article originally published here
Advertisements

Mexico’s International Trade Agenda for 2017

mexico1International events such as “Brexit,” the United States’ potential withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) or the possibility of renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are all extremely relevant for Mexico’s economy – which has the fourth-largest gross domestic product (GDP) in the Americas and the 15th-largest GDP in the world. The Mexican economy rests heavily on its exports, making 2017 a particularly challenging year for Mexico’s international trade agenda during this last year of the current administration. In 2018, Mexico will hold federal elections to designate a new president and Congress.

The Mexican international trade agenda will be most likely occupied by existing negotiations – such as the modernization of the European Union (EU)-Mexico Global Agreement – as well as with current trade issues such as China’s steel overcapacity and the sugar export restrictions imposed on Mexican exports to the U.S., but there are certain likely events that deserve a close examination:

  • likely formalization of the United Kingdom’s exit from the EU – widely known as “Brexit” – a formal invocation of Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty that may have an impact in the current free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations with the EU and also may require bilateral negotiations with the UK
  • renegotiation of NAFTA or a possible U.S. withdrawal
  • formal U.S. withdrawal from the TPP and/or possible revival of the initiative in a different format – with or without the U.S.
  • surge of trade protectionist measures, not only through the adoption of additional unilateral measures allowed under international trade agreements, either by Mexico or against Mexican exports, such as antidumping and countervailing duties, but also through more aggressive unilateral actions (customs duties increases, safeguards investigations, tax or export restrictions, etc.), all of which may result in additional dispute settlement proceedings under the World Trade Organization (WTO) or bilateral FTAs – such as NAFTA Chapter XIX­– and investment treaties
  • increase activism by Mexico to diversify its export destinations and foreign direct investment sources, particularly with China, Korea and Japan, to expand and increase trade flows. (Mexico already has an FTA with Japan, has explored the possibility of an FTA with Korea and has not formally expressed yet any interest to negotiate with China)
  • increased pressure by China to obtain recognition from Mexico as a market economy, which could have a serious impact on new antidumping investigations and on the 27 existing antidumping duty orders against Chinese products (out of the current 52 products that are subject to antidumping orders in Mexico); China recently filed for consultations with the EU and the U.S. under the WTO to address this matter

On its own, 2017 will be a busy, uncertain year for Mexico’s trade agenda. The uncertainty over Mexico’s relationship with the U.S. will add additional stress to the system. While the debate will continue to rage in the U.S. as to whether NAFTA was a good trade deal for the U.S., NAFTA brought benefits to Mexico that created a more stable neighbor for the U.S.

Article originally published here