Uruguay and Chile, least corrupt countries in LAC region says Transparency International

uruguay-corrupcionIn Latin America, Uruguay leads with a ranking of 21, followed by The Bahamas and Chile both in 24th place, and Venezuela figures at the bottom.

Over two-thirds of the 176 countries and territories in this year’s Corruption Perceptions Index fall below the midpoint of a scale spanning 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean), said Transparency International (TI) upon the release of the non-profit’s 2016 report. No country reached above 90.

The global average score is a paltry 43, indicating endemic corruption in a country’s public sector. And top-scoring countries are far outnumbered by countries where citizens face the tangible impact of corruption on a daily basis.

Results can be viewed on a map at the TI website.

In Latin America, Uruguay leads with a ranking of 21, followed by The Bahamas and Chile both in 24th place, and Venezuela figures at the bottom.

This year’s results highlight the connection between corruption and inequality, which synergistically create a vicious circle of corruption, unequal distribution of power, and unequal distribution of wealth, said the index researchers.

“In too many countries, people are deprived of their most basic needs and go to bed hungry every night because of corruption, while the powerful and corrupt enjoy lavish lifestyles with impunity,” said José Ugaz, Chair of Transparency International

The interplay of corruption and inequality also feeds populism, said TI. When traditional politicians fail to tackle corruption, people grow cynical and are more include to elect populist leaders who promise to break the cycle of corruption and privilege. Yet this is likely to exacerbate – rather than resolve – the tensions that fed the populist surge in the first place.

Leading the index of countries examined in 2016 were Denmark and New Zealand with scores of 90/100. At the bottom of the ranking sit South Sudan with 11/100 and Somalia with 10/100, according to the index results.

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Emerging Nations Have Taken the Lead on Renewable Energy

Historically speaking, wealthier, developed nations, particularly the US and Europe, have led the world on renewable energy, investing the most capital and building the most capacity. Last year, that changed.

In 2015, for the first time, countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) invested more in renewable energy and added more renewable capacity than the 15 OECD countries combined.

This is only a bit of symbolism — the lines have been converging for a while — but it is important symbolism.

Led by China, emerging nations have emerged

The finding comes from the 2016 Climatescope report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). It’s an annual snapshot of the state of clean energy in non-OECD countries. It goes deep, ranking countries on policies, finance, value chains, and various other metrics.

They’ve got an excellent data visualization to walk you through the results, if you’re interested, and a cool widget that allows you to compare any two countries on any set of metrics.

To me, the headline news is illustrated by two charts. This shows renewable-energy capacity additions from 2011 to 2015:

climatesope capacity additions(BNEF)

As you can see, after some fluctuations, non-OECD countries nosed ahead last year. It might bump around another year or two, but the longer term trend is clear: The center of clean-energy gravity is moving south.

And it’s almost entirely due to China. The country installed 142 gigawatts (!) of new power generation capacity in 2015, of which 33 GW was wind and 18 GW was solar PV. (Compare to India, which installed 27.8 GW of new capacity — 2.6 GW of wind and 1.7 GW of solar PV.)

This shows renewable-energy investment from 2011 to 2015:

climatescope investment(BNEF)

Again, these numbers might bump around for a few years, but renewable-energy investment in non-OECD countries is headed up, whereas investment in developed nations seems to have plateaued.

The surge in non-OECD investment is led by solar:

Investment in utility-scale solar in Climatescope nations spiked 43% from 2014 to $71.8bn in 2015. Total clean energy investment in Climatescope countries rose $24.8bn with solar accounting for nearly all of that. Photovoltaic (PV) costs are essentially on par with wind and, as recent tenders for power contracts have demonstrated, PV can now out-compete fossil-fuelled projects on price.

Solar and wind now dominate renewable-energy investment. “Together, [wind and solar] accounted for 65% of new clean energy investment in 2011,” BNEF writes. “By 2015, that had risen to 94%.”

And investment is spreading beyond China as well (this is from a different BNEF report):

An expanded list of emerging countries committed billions to clean energy last year with record increases, including Mexico ($4.2bn, up 114%), Chile ($3.5bn, up 157%), South Africa ($4.5bn, up 329%) and Morocco ($2bn, up from almost zero in 2014).

The world’s fate will now be decided by the race between coal and renewable energy in the Southern Hemisphere. Coal growth is slowing, but we are still headed for catastrophe.

This (okay, fine, three charts) is from the US EIA’s International Energy Outlook 2016:

EIA: energy sources through 2040(EIA)

If this unfolds, global average temperatures will exceed 2 degrees — possibly even 3 or 4. To stop short of 2 degrees, global coal use will need to be close to zero by 2040, with oil not far behind.

Emerging nations, like their OECD counterparts, are moving in the right direction, but too slowly.

Article originally published here

IDB Approves US$100mn Loan for Chile’s Sustainable Energy Sector

renewenergyThe Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) approved a US$100mn loan to the government of Chile to finance a sustainable energy program.

Objectives of the program include simplifying the rate structures and processes of natural monopolies; fomenting competition in the generation and transmission segment; and promoting the development of renewables and energy efficiency, IDB said in a statement.

The program “will develop a long-term energy policy … whose goals are to boost competition and efficiency in the energy market, improve institutional capability, encourage diversification and the use of renewable energy sources, promote efficient energy use, and increase exchanges and transfer of energy at the international level,” IDB said in a statement.

Chile has stated a goal of achieving a 70% renewable-powered electricity sector by 2050.

How Canadian Cleantech Companies can Make Their Mark in Chile

mars_chile

Canadian clean technology companies looking to pursue the Chilean market need to read this latest installment of the Going Global Series on international energy markets.

Published by the Advanced Energy Centre at MaRS, these market insight reports provide a 360 degree view of the energy system in priority markets, for export-ready Canadian energy companies. The reports examine not only the energy and electricity landscape of this market but also the business environment, the social, political and legal frameworks, and the country’s macroeconomic drivers.

The latest installment in this series is an update on the previous Going Global Chile report, published in July 2015, providing revised data and investigating new drivers and trends. In short, the analysis is meant to help companies answer key questions:

  • Are your capabilities a good fit for the market?
  • What are the opportunities and barriers to doing business, and do the former outweigh the latter?
Article originally published here